Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineers use their understanding of science, medicine, and engineering to create devices, procedures, and materials that monitor and improve human health. Purdue’s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering (BME) curriculum incorporates engineering fundamentals, design, and analysis, as well as coursework in organic chemistry, biochemistry, biomaterials, bioelectricity, biomechanics, and biological heat and mass transfer. Students gain hands-on engineering experience through intensive lab coursework and by solving real-life biomedical problems.

Note: The First-Year Engineering Program is the entry point for all beginning engineering students. They must complete the First-Year Engineering requirements before entering the engineering school of their choice. The mission of this student-oriented service program is to advise, teach and retain outstanding students for Purdue's College of Engineering. This core curriculum includes courses in math, chemistry, physics, computer programming, and communication skills, as well as introductory engineering coursework taught in the new Ideas to Innovation (i2i) Learning Laboratory. The First-Year Engineering Program provides students with a firm foundation and initial understanding of engineering and career options to assist them in identifying which of Purdue's engineering disciplines is the right fit. Our professional academic advisors, faculty and student advisors are dedicated to assisting beginning engineers with the first-year experience.

Biomedical Engineering Website

Plan of Study

Biomedical Engineering, BSBME

Related Career Interests

Careers in Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineers can work in medical device, consumer goods and pharmaceutical companies, universities, hospitals and government agencies; enroll in graduate school; or attend a professional school such as medical, dental, veterinary, business, or law. Specific responsibilities can include:

  • developing biocompatible materials and devices for implantation, such as artificial organs, cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, joints, and tissue constructs
  • designing advanced imaging or diagnostic technologies
  • using nanotechnology to develop micromachines for repairing cell damage and altering gene function
  • creating sensors for measuring blood chemistry
  • developing advanced pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical delivery systems

Transfer to Biomedical Engineering

Purdue admits to individual majors. In addition to meeting overall Purdue transfer criteria, such as minimum high school course requirements, applicants must also meet major-specific requirements. The major-specific criteria for this program are listed below. Students who meet or exceed these are the most competitive candidates for admission. Before applying, review the closed programs page to confirm your desired major is open to transfer students for your desired entry term.

Program Availability: Closed to transfers

Contact Information
Cindy Holderbaum
(765) 494-2995
cholderb@purdue.edu

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